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We Sure All Are [Descendants] Of King Tut

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A group of about 50 protested the King Tut exhibition at the Franklin Institute yesterday, including Temple prof. Molefi Asante, who said: “This is an area of criminal theft, identity theft.” Somebody needs a Capital One card.

The identity thief here is the King Tut exhibit, which protesters said shows King Tut as white — “looks more like Boy George than the boy king” — and doesn’t mention Egypt is in Africa, leading people to believe Egypt is in Europe. (If someone thinks Egypt is in Europe, he or she most likely has bigger problems than thinking King Tut was white.) The exhibit has been protested since it arrived in America, and the Franklin Institute will be holding a symposium where everyone will be calm and nice to each other this summer.

Also, wait ’til these people find out most people probably believe Jesus was a pale white dude rather than a Middle Eastern guy. But even that wouldn’t stop hot dog vendor George Williams, who knows that King Tut is all about togetherness:

George Williams, who is black and operates a pretzel cart in front of the museum, said he believes that King Tut is a piece of history all people share.

“Regardless if he was black or white, we’re all equal and we’re all [descendants] of King Tut,” he said. “We can love each other.”

Wait, who is King Tut again? He apparently sired the entire human race and I think I’ve gotten him confused with someone else.

Protesters at exhibit say King Tut was black [Daily News]

  1. Michael Durnack Says: May 21 3:11 PM

    You may have confused him with Steve Martin.

    Anyone remember that song?

  2. Murph Says: May 21 3:34 PM

    What’s funny is that, a few months ago, I was passing through the 11th Street station on the Market Frankford line and a fellow was saying something similar: that he was King Tut, and that we were all descendants of King Tut. Really, he was more shouting than saying this. He had also urinated all over himself, which did not do much to prove his point.

  3. Mike Says: Jun 28 1:55 AM

    I think this is sad. We may never know what color he was. but it is unfair for people of today to take the images of what these people left of themselves and change them from brown skin-black as the statues and images left in his tomb and white french people-white Americans-Light Skinned Egyptians find a way to make King Tut White and then present it to the world that this is what he looked like. Something that makes you go HHHMMMMMM!!!!!!!

  4. RaeJene Says: Aug 28 9:52 AM

    I think that it’s a shame that he is depicted as white to appease a group of people. We should keep history true, if King Tut were in Ireland and they depicted him as being brown skinned when the majority of the people are white, how many people would actually believe this to be true to form?

  5. RaeJene Says: Aug 28 9:52 AM

    I think that it’s a shame that he is depicted as white to appease a group of people. We should keep history true, if King Tut were in Ireland and they depicted him as being brown skinned when the majority of the people are white, how many people would actually believe this to be true to form?

  6. victor Says: Aug 28 11:59 AM

    You have to understand this from the point of view of white people. If King Tut is depicted as black then the Great Egyptian Civilization was built by the ancestors of black people. Now, imagine what that will do the psyche of the average white person?
    Western civilization was founded on the lie of white supremacy/non-white inferiority. One of the responsibilities of western academia is to support this lie using the cloak of “objectivity”. Go figure.

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